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Frog Fractions

 

Games
Jon Aleckson 11/14/2012 - 14:38
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Screen capture of NCRA scenario

Research
Jon Aleckson 10/31/2012 - 10:36
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On May 11th, I will be participating in a serious gaming panel at the National Summit on Serious Games in Higher Education. Representatives from across the country will gather at Excelsior College in Albany, NY where we will discuss the use of educational-based video games with a focus on increasing student engagement and interactivity.

News
Jon Aleckson 05/03/2012 - 12:44
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Jon Aleckson receives award

As the summer winds down, so does my conference schedule. However, I had the opportunity at the end of August to attend the Serious Play Conference at the DigiPen Institute of Technology in Redmond, WA. The event was a great mix of academics and practitioners, all excited to discuss the very latest on game development and design.

News
Jon Aleckson 09/21/2011 - 14:33
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Ancient Lives, from Zooniverse

In July, researchers asked the public for help in translating hundreds of thousands of ancient papyrus fragments in the Ancient Lives online project. On the Ancient Lives website, anyone can play a quick tutorial and then start identifying Greek characters in papyrus fragments.

Just a few days ago, gamers on the protein-folding game FoldIt solved a biological puzzle that had scientists completely baffled.

With the Internet and social media bringing large numbers of people together, there is a great opportunity for causes such as Ancient Lives and FoldIt. Games with a purpose, as these initiatives are sometimes called, harness the power of people to advance human knowledge. In return for lending our collective brainpower, we get the excitement of contributing to something meaningful and, ideally, we enjoy a fun game experience as well.

Have a free moment? Try one of these games with a purpose:

Games
Asia Comeau 09/20/2011 - 15:37
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Well folks, my brief stint as an occasional blogger at Games Can Teach is coming to an end. I’ll be starting a postdoctoral teaching fellowship at Luther College in the fall, and thus leaving GCT in the able hands of my soon-to-be-former co-workers and co-bloggers.

Before I go, however, I’m happy to be able to introduce Virulent, an exciting new game from the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  The game is available as a free app for the iPad through the iTunes Store, or through the game website.

Games
Michael O Brien 07/18/2011 - 11:43
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GLS Conference

I attended the GLS conference yesterday and was most impressed by the caliber of attendee and the fabulous posters depicting the best and the brightest game/research projects going on. This link will take you to a photo montage of the poster event which quickly and visually displays high quality game development projects (mostly related to education). Most projects also had a research mission. Bravo GLS.

News
Jon Aleckson 06/16/2011 - 08:19
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PlayTrue Challenge Game

The economy has had an impact on how many potential game and simulation projects commissioned. To make matters worse, when government, non-profit or grant funded institutions look to inform and educate using a game stakeholders are often tentative about allowing certain game mechanics. “No, we cannot allow game players to do that.” The PlayTrue Challenge game “case study” is a good example of how the World Anti Doping Agency agreed to allow bad behavior to take place within a online game.

News
Jon Aleckson 06/15/2011 - 12:49
Michael O Brien's picture
BiblioBouts Logo

 

One of the paradoxes of serious academic research in the digital age is that as information becomes more readily and widely available, it becomes harder for untrained readers to find high-quality, trustworthy information, and to tell the difference between the good and bad. “The Internet” is not an undifferentiated mass of equally good information – you can read about a medical condition on Wikipedia or in the Lancet, but you wouldn’t want to go to a doctor who didn’t understand why one is a better source than the other.

 

What makes a source credible? What makes it scholarly? What’s the difference between citing an article in Sports Illustrated and one in Sports medicine? As some thoughtful teachers of undergraduates are reporting, many students don’t come to college equipped with the ability to make these determinations.

 

A research team at the University of Michigan Institute of Museum and Library Studies has developed a new approach to teaching these skills: an online, social game called BiblioBouts.

Research
Michael O Brien 04/20/2011 - 14:35
Asia Comeau's picture

There has been a lot of buzz about texting while driving lately, so this week, I thought it necessary to review a game that tries to teach about the dangers of distractions while behind the wheel. What came to mind was a game that The New York Times brought to light in an article called Gauging Your Distraction.

Gauging Your Distaction - Gameplay Image

In this game, you operate a vehicle that is passing through a series of gates that cover six numbered lanes. As you pass through them, you receive intermittent text messages on a cell phone that you must respond to by using your mouse to click on keys on the phone, simultaneously you must safely navigating to the correct lanes with the open gates by using the number keys on your keyboard. At the end of the game, you are shown a bar graph of your reaction times throughout the course of the game, and how they varied between the times when you were texting and the times when you were weren’t. You are also shown a comparison of your reaction time while texting to the average player’s reaction time, alongside some interesting facts about texting while driving.

Games
Asia Comeau 12/08/2010 - 16:34